GNOME 2.20 Review

Just discovered that ars technica features an extensive review of GNOME 2.20 including a review of Deskbar.

The article critizes the move to new UI while the old ones have been removed (as many other people do that, too). Although, the Roadmap for 2.22 contains that one of the old UIs should return I won't make any promises. The task is obviously pretty complex and the new "old" UI should get enough testing, as well.

In addition, my main focus will be new-stuff-manager in the next release cycle. I'll start working on new-stuff-manager very soon. If new-stuff-manager is in shape I'm going to improve new-stuff-manager support in Deskbar isself. Therefore, I don't know when that taks is completed. Till then, I will limit my time working on Deskbar.

But you could help. I'd love to assist anybody who wants to step up and implement one of the old UIs (which one has still to be decided).

Comments

(I am a gnome fanboy)

I just find it so funny; the Appearance Preferences give a total flashback to Mac OS 8.5. I followed Mac OS closely it its heyday, and I remember this one being a big upgrade at one point.

And now, a decade later, it is there in Gnome 2.20! Appearance Preferences! (same name, same concept; before that Mac OS had fonts, background and theme selection separately :)

cheers.

"The article critizes the move to new UI while the old ones have been removed (as many other people do that, too). Although, the Roadmap for 2.22 contains that one of the old UIs should return I won't make any promises. The task is obviously pretty complex and the new "old" UI should get enough testing, as well."

The whole deskbar was rewritten, and the new UI was rapid implemented, its clear to me that the UI has changed without any testing for usability aspects. How can the 6 month release cycle for 2.22 be too short time to implement the old UI? Worse than that, why change the UI so dramaticaly with a crap version, and commit the changes to the oficial release? People will be installing manually the old deskbar just because of the UI (I'm seeing this happening with Ubuntu beta users), and live with the old version full of hacks anyway until 2.22 is out with a good or the old interface back. So, in the end, the reworked code shouldnt be put on trunk until the interface is polished. IMHO, it was a bad move, a lack of responsability with the end-users.

GNOME wouldnt be any good with things like these happening. A small slip like this is a big catastrofe to the user base. Some people complain about GNOME development being so slow, or not having so many developers as, e.g., KDE, which is now coming to the fourth version full of new code. Making changes without consulting users (and GNOME has a huge user base) is a hobbist atitude and will decrease the user- and developer- base, until no one likes it anymore and leave it.

Anyway, I will be working on the deskbar code and submit patches to get a good UI to the 2.22 release. I hope my code is good enough and my patches get accepted.

Good luck!

In reply to by Henrique (not verified)

The most part of  the work really didn't take place starting the first day of the 2.20 release cycle but the 3 months of Google Summer of Code. After refactoring the core of Deskbar there was not much time left for the UI. I didn't make sense to keep the old UI and "just" refactor the remainder, because the hacky UI code was one of the arguments to start refactoring in the first place. It may not seem too important to the user that the code is hacky, but this makes it very difficult to spot and fix bugs.
I appreciate that you want take part in developing Deskbar. Please post you ideas/patches to the mailing list, if you feel ready.

Please give us back the option of having the textbox embedded in the panel. Who made this decision 1 day before the GUI freeze?!?